Note to Readers:

Please Note: The editor of Impact of Sex & War blog is a member of the Ecology of Peace culture.

The problems of poverty, unemployment, war, crime, violence, food shortages, food price increases, inflation, police brutality, political instability, loss of civil rights, vanishing species, garbage and pollution, urban sprawl, traffic jams, toxic waste, racism, sexism, Nazism, Islamism, feminism, Zionism etc; are the ecological overshoot consequences of humans living in accordance to a Masonic War is Peace international law social contract that provides humans the ‘right to breed and consume’ with total disregard for ecological carrying capacity limits.

Ecology of Peace factual reality: 1. Earth is not flat; 2. Resources are finite; 3. When humans breed or consume above ecological carrying capacity limits, it results in resource conflict; 4. If individuals, families, tribes, races, religions, and/or nations want to reduce class, racial and/or religious local, national and international resource war conflict; they should cooperate to implement an Ecology of Peace international law social contract that restricts all the worlds citizens to breed and consume below ecological carrying capacity limits; to sustainably protect and conserve natural resources.

EoP v WiP NWO negotiations are documented at MILED Clerk Notice.

Tuesday, January 1, 2013

U.S. Forest Service Predicts a Strain on Natural Resources Due to Rapid Population Growth



U.S. Forest Service Predicts a Strain on Natural Resources Due to Rapid Population Growth

U.S. Forest Service report outlines how a growing population and increased urbanization in the next 50 years will drain the nation's natural resources including water supplies, open space, and forests.

Friday, December 21, 2012, 9:46 AM EST | Numbers USA


The U.S. Forest Service has released a report this week which outlines how a growing population and increased urbanization in the next 50 years will drain the nation's natural resources including water supplies, open space, and forests. A recent study from the Center for Immigration Studies found that if current immigration levels remain steady, the population of the United States will increase by 127 million by the year 2050.

The same CIS study determined that population would increase by 78.9 million by the year 2050 should immigration levels be cut in half.

The U.S. Forest Service study shows the potential for a significant loss of privately-owned forestland, which could dramatically reduce the benefits Americans receive from the land such as clean water, wildlife habitat, and forest products.


Agriculture Under Secretary Harris Sherman had this to say about the report: "We should all be concerned by the projected decline in our nation’s forests and the corresponding loss of the many critical services they provide such as clean drinking water, wildlife habitat, carbon sequestration, wood products and outdoor recreation."

The report projects that urban and developed land in the U.S. will increase by 41 percent by 2060. Forested areas will see the most impact from this growth, with losses ranging from 16 to 34 million acres in the lower 48 states. Additionally, total urban and developed land area is projected to increase between 39 and 69 million acres between 2010 and 2060, an increase of 41 to 77 percent.

Population growth in arid regions presents yet another problem in our country's future. These dry, western states have taken on the fastest population growth and will require significantly more drinking water as a result - something that our land will not be able to produce, according to the assessment.

The report's projections are influenced by a set of scenarios with assumptions about U.S. population and economic growth, global population and economic growth, global wood energy consumption and U.S. land use change from 2010 to 2060. Using those variables, the assessment forecasts these key trends:

Forest areas will decline as a result of development, particularly in the South, where population is projected to grow the most.

The combination of increasing water demand and declining water yields leads to an increase in vulnerability of the water supply to shortage in large portions of the United States, especially in the larger Southwest and Great Plains.

Rangeland area is expected to continue its slow decline.

Biodiversity may continue to erode because projected loss of forestland will impact the variety of forest species.

Under Secretary Sherman concluded his thoughts on the report: "Today’s report offers a sobering perspective on what is at stake and the need to maintain our commitment to conserve these critical assets."

» » » » [Numbers USA]


US Forest Service report forecasts natural resource management trends and challenges for next 50 years

Study projects significant forest loss due to suburbanization and land fragmentation

US Forest Service | 18 December 2012



WASHINGTON, Dec. 18, 2012 —A comprehensive U.S. Forest Service report released today examines the ways expanding populations, increased urbanization, and changing land-use patterns could profoundly impact natural resources, including water supplies, nationwide during the next 50 years.

Significantly, the study shows the potential for significant loss of privately-owned forests to development and fragmentation, which could substantially reduce benefits from forests that the public now enjoys including clean water, wildlife habitat, forest products and others.

“We should all be concerned by the projected decline in our nation’s forests and the corresponding loss of the many critical services they provide such as clean drinking water, wildlife habitat, carbon sequestration, wood products and outdoor recreation,” said Agriculture Under Secretary Harris Sherman. “Today’s report offers a sobering perspective on what is at stake and the need to maintain our commitment to conserve these critical assets.”

U.S Forest Service scientists and partners at universities, non-profits and other agencies found urban and developed land areas in the U.S. will increase 41 percent by 2060. Forested areas will be most impacted by this growth, with losses ranging from 16 to 34 million acres in the lower 48 states. The study also examines the effect of climate change on forests and the services forests provide.

Most importantly, over the long-term, climate change could have significant effects on water availability, making the US potentially more vulnerable to water shortages, especially in the Southwest and Great Plains. Population growth in more arid regions will require more drinking water. Recent trends in agricultural irrigation and land­scaping techniques also will boost water demands.

“Our nation’s forests and grasslands are facing significant challenges. This assessment strengthens our commitment to accelerate restoration efforts that will improve forest resiliency and conservation of vitally important natural resources,” said U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell.

The assessment’s projections are influenced by a set of scenarios with varying assumptions about U.S. population and economic growth, global population and economic growth, global wood energy consumption and U.S. land use change from 2010 to 2060. Using those scenarios, the report forecasts the following key trends:

* Forest areas will decline as a result of development, particularly in the South, where population is projected to grow the most;

* Timber prices are expected to remain relatively flat;

* Rangeland area is expected to continue its slow decline but rangeland productivity is stable with forage sufficient to meet expected livestock grazing demands;

* Biodiversity may continue to erode because projected loss of forestland will impact the variety of forest species;

* Recreation use is expected to trend upward.

Additionally, the report stresses the need to develop forest and rangeland policies, which are flexible enough to be effective under a wide range of future socioeconomic and ecological conditions such as climate change. The Forest and Rangelands Renewable Resources Planning Act of 1974 requires the Forest Service to produce an assessment of natural resource trends every 10 years.

The mission of the Forest Service is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the nation’s forests and grasslands to meet the needs of present and future generations. The agency manages 193 million acres of public land, provides assistance to state and private landowners, and maintains the largest forestry research organization in the world. Forest Service lands contribute more than $13 billion to the economy each year through visitor spending alone. Those same lands provide 20 percent of the nation’s clean water supply, a value estimated at $27 billion per year.

» » » » [Forest Service]

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